Video 8 Sep 4,511 notes

ca-tsuka:

Sculptures by Andrea Blasich for production of The Dam Keeper animated short-film directed by Dice Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo.

Video 3 Sep 24,720 notes

maribelhearn:

3D Ladybug vs 2D Ladybug (ver. 2012) transformation

The Ladybug anime done by Toei Animation will launch as web-episodes in 2015 in addition to the release of the 26 episode 3D Ladybug series.

Adala-news (16 July 2014):

C’est par le biais de studio Zagtoon que nous apprenons la production d’un anime, Ladybug par le studio Toei Animation (saga One Piece, saga PreCure) !

Des web-épisodes en 2D (Toei Animation) sont prévus courant 2015, en France (internet & TV). Plus d’informations prochainement.

Et la série animée en 3D (26 épisodes – Method Animation & Zagtoon) est prévue pour Septembre 2015 sur TF1 en France & sur Disney Channel à l’international.

*This project is/was known also as Miraculous Ladybug

Text 11 Aug 1,978 notes [DEAL] For less than $50, get high (resolution design elements)

clientsfromhell:

image

Designers who want to be as smooth as the vectors they produce need to check out the Creative Edge Design Bundle for sale over at Mighty Deals. The whole pack is 95% off and the elements are free to use for personal or commercial purposes.

Pick up the whole pack for $49 for the next 48 hours! It includes over $1000 worth of design elements that will help you convince your clients that clip art isn’t the only option.

Check out the deal here

[image via x]

Photo 10 Aug 12,066 notes teacup-bat:

tea-bug:

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

THIS. let me tell you, I recently gave fiverr a go. I was offering little pencil crayon sketches because that was the only thing I was willing to do for all of $5 - althought note - the artist only receives $4 because fiverr takes 20% - then it turned out I wasn’t actually willing to do that for $4 so I removed my gig. But my gig didn’t get much attention because there are many artists on there who are willing to do a LOT more than a pencil sketch for very little, and it made me realise that fiverr is just a bad, poisonous idea. They won’t even let you put links to your portfolio or anything in your info, so you can’t promote your regular commission info. Even though I was only on fiverr a short time I recieved messages enquiring about more complex illustrations than what I was offering on the site who were ultimately uninterested when I wasn’t willing to do them for $5Just waiting for my payments to clear & then I’ll be cancelling my account. Seriously not worth it, and promotes poor attitude towards artists & designers & the ‘something for nothing’ attitude that seems to be going around so much at the moment.

Absolutely disgusting.

teacup-bat:

tea-bug:

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

THIS. let me tell you, I recently gave fiverr a go. I was offering little pencil crayon sketches because that was the only thing I was willing to do for all of $5 - althought note - the artist only receives $4 because fiverr takes 20% - then it turned out I wasn’t actually willing to do that for $4 so I removed my gig.
But my gig didn’t get much attention because there are many artists on there who are willing to do a LOT more than a pencil sketch for very little, and it made me realise that fiverr is just a bad, poisonous idea.
They won’t even let you put links to your portfolio or anything in your info, so you can’t promote your regular commission info. Even though I was only on fiverr a short time I recieved messages enquiring about more complex illustrations than what I was offering on the site who were ultimately uninterested when I wasn’t willing to do them for $5
Just waiting for my payments to clear & then I’ll be cancelling my account.
Seriously not worth it, and promotes poor attitude towards artists & designers & the ‘something for nothing’ attitude that seems to be going around so much at the moment.

Absolutely disgusting.
Photo 9 Aug 210 notes delusioninabox:

Daily #605! Problem? I don’t have a problem!
(…all I bought were comics.)

delusioninabox:

Daily #605! Problem? I don’t have a problem!

(…all I bought were comics.)

Video 6 Aug 17,898 notes

lettiebobettie:

Hey so I haven’t updated the mural in a year now (yikes!) So I put my room together enough to get more shots
It’s still not done….!;;; but it’s getting pretty close 
This is really crowded it looks bad oop
Anyway I hope you like!

via Bumble Bee.
Quote 5 Aug 58,961 notes
I firmly believe in small gestures: pay for their coffee, hold the door for strangers, over tip, smile or try to be kind even when you don’t feel like it, pay compliments, chase the kid’s runaway ball down the sidewalk and throw it back to him, try to be larger than you are— particularly when it’s difficult. People do notice, people appreciate. I appreciate it when it’s done to (for) me. Small gestures can be an effort, or actually go against our grain (“I’m not a big one for paying compliments…”), but the irony is that almost every time you make them, you feel better about yourself. For a moment life suddenly feels lighter, a bit more Gene Kelly dancing in the rain.
— Jonathan Carroll  (via theremina)

(Source: quotethat)

Text 31 Jul 218,773 notes

staff:

rustandlead:

fearlesslarry:

koishy:

can we just talk about how this always ends up happening somehow

image

I end up with 10+ tabs all the time

i end up with so many that they don’t even say tumblr they are just little squares.

image

Text 22 Jul 35,045 notes

theconsultingshieldmaiden:

aegontargaryen:

friendly reminder that if harry would have been a girl snape would have treated her like petyr baelish treats sansa stark ✿◕‿◕✿

image

Video 22 Jul 12,118 notes

wannabeanimator:

The Boxtrolls (2014) | Behind the Scenes

via Animation Magazine:

  • 1 week; the average amount of time for an animator to complete 3.7 seconds of footage
  • 3.5 inches, the cuff-to-cuff measurement of baby Eggs’ sweater (created on an embroidery machine to produce irregular lines, like a hand-knitted garment). His little socks are only ⅝” long
  • 4 scenes per week was the goal for each animator
  • 14 different fabrics were used in Lord Portley-Rind’s white hat
  • 24 kinds of weeds were created for backgrounds by the greens department
  • 55 different sculpts of prop cheeses were made; different scale sizes were needed for wide, medium and close shots
Quote 21 Jul 29,327 notes
If a Disney princess had night terrors, the story of Sansa Stark might be what woke her up screaming. Often overlooked in favor of her killer kid sister, the elder Stark sibling has had all her illusions about the world, and her safety in it, shattered. But her quiet, innate political shrewdness and emotional strength have enabled her to survive in a royal court that likely would have cost every other member of her family their heads. She’s the show’s best-kept secret.
— 

Rollingstone about Sansa Stark in their list of top 40 game of thrones characters. Sansa is number 4. x (via tomlincum)

I love Sansa. Nobody understand and I always say: “That’s because you only stay in the surface of the character, she’s great.”

(Source: unproblematicfave)

Video 10 Jul 13,879 notes

ra-punze-l:

Hellfire + Concept Art

(Source: marymacdnald)

Video 10 Jul 5,415 notes

arendellekingdom:

Storyboard to Final Version of the movie

the party is over | big summer blow out | attack on elsa’s castle

Text 10 Jul 149,844 notes

shuckl:

nothingman:

Doing The Pledge of Allegiance every school day for 4 or 5 years is one of those things that don’t seem strange when you’re young

But then you get older and you realized “yeah, swearing your allegiance to a flag for about 200+ days out of 365 day year in unity with other small children is without a doubt a creepy as fuck activity”

wait is that actually a thing american schoolchildren do what the fuck

Something like that was mandatory in my country… when it was a fascist country.

Video 9 Jul 587 notes
via CATSUKA.

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